Competition

I saw a tweet from a sports journalist on Sunday night.
It stated that since 1985 there have been fifteen different winners of The Super Bowl (Final of American Rugby variation) and seventeen different winners of Baseball’s World Series.

That seemed an indication of healthy competition. To provide a little more context, there are 32 NFL teams and 30 baseball teams. There have been 30 Super Bowls, and 28 World Series since 1985 (Baseball missed a year due to a strike and has not had its 2014 competition)

In comparison there have been 8 winners from the English Premier League (and its predecessor the old Division One) since 1985. That speaks to a major difference in the level of competitiveness; made worse by the fact that only five teams have won the league since the start of the Premier League era in 1993.

The mix of the draft, revenue sharing, and in the case of the NFL a salary cap help maintain a competitive balance in US sports that seems sadly lacking in the English football league and the situation is even more dire in Scotland where just three teams have won the title since 1985 (and two since 1986, with Aberdeen’s last win coming in 1985)

In the US even if you know your team won’t win this year you can realistically believe that your team could win in your lifetime; unless you are a fan of the Cubs, whose last World Series win was 1908.

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Published in: on 4 February, 2014 at 7:00  Leave a Comment  

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