Not a Shot

Hot on the heels of National Daiquiri Day, Wednesday was National Tequila Day. In the UK, the only Tequila available tends to be cheap firewater, suitable only for shots or being drowned in fruit-juice. Here, in the US, however, there are some fine, complex examples of the drink that can be savoured, or used in cocktails that highlight the drink’s flavour.

Tequila is made from the sap of the blue agave plant. Regulations require that at least 51% of the contents are so derived; the other 49% can be corn or cane syrup. These blends make up the cheap end of the market and are those that are shipped to the UK. 100% Agave Tequila is more expensive and far more interesting to taste. There are several categories of aged Tequila. Reposado is aged in oak for at least two months, which barely counts as aging in my opinion, but does create a smoother, more nuanced flavour. Añejo is aged between one and three years in small oak casks. I have tasted Añejo Tequila’s with a smokiness and complexity that compares to decent whiskey.

blue_agave_oasis

To mark National Tequila Day, I made two different cocktails.

Demon of Destiny

1.5oz Gin
3/4oz Sweet Vermouth
1/2oz Absinthe
1/4oz Reposado Tequila
1/4oz Agave Syrup

This is clearly not a Tequila forward drink and it was selected to also reflect the naming of the Royal Sprog. I am not suggesting an Omen like Demonic child, but I used St George Absinthe. The drink’s flavour was overwhelmed by the aniseed from the Absinthe. If I were to try this again, I would cut the Absinthe down to a teaspoon, or a wash.

The second drink was The Dooce Cocktail

1oz Green Chartreuse
1oz Añejo Tequila
1oz Punt E Mes, Sweet Vermouth
2ds Orange Bitters

This was a far better drink in which to taste the Tequila, albeit in a supporting role to the herbal brilliance of the other two ingredients.

Advertisements
Published in: on 28 July, 2013 at 6:00  Leave a Comment  

The URI to TrackBack this entry is: https://britinla.wordpress.com/2013/07/28/not-a-shot/trackback/

RSS feed for comments on this post.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: